bouche


bouche

bouche [boosh] ExamplesWord Origin noun Armor.

  1. a curved indentation in an upper corner of a jousting shield, serving as a lance rest: used from the 14th to the 17th century.

Origin of bouche French phrase à bouche literally, with (a) mouth, said of a notched shield. See bouchée Bouché [boo-shey] noun

  1. Louis,1896–1969, U.S. painter.

Examples from the Web for bouche Historical Examples of bouche

  • Nor in gougre or beignet or bouche will Parmesan betray confidence.

    The Feasts of Autolycus

    Elizabeth Robins Pennell

  • The dogs were above in the tent—all but Bouche, who was permitted to be near his master.

    The March Of The White Guard

    Gilbert Parker

  • He touched the head as if it had been that of a child, and said: “Lie down, Bouche.”

    The March Of The White Guard

    Gilbert Parker

  • In a moment more he had placed Bouche at the head of the first team of dogs.

    The March Of The White Guard

    Gilbert Parker

  • When he is well we will go to London with It, Bouche, and we needn’t meet her.

    The March Of The White Guard

    Gilbert Parker

  • Word Origin and History for bouche n.

    French, literally “mouth” (Old French boche, 11c.), from Latin bucca, literally “cheek,” which in Late Latin replaced os (see oral) as the word for “mouth” (and also is the source of Italian bocca, Spanish boca). Borrowed in English in various senses, e.g. “king’s allowance of food for his retinue” (mid-15c.); “mouth” (1580s); “metal plug for a cannon’s vent” (1862; verb in this sense from 1781).

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