brach


brach

brach brachet (ˈbrætʃɪt) noun

  1. archaic a bitch hound

Word Origin for brach C14: back formation from brachez hunting dogs, from Old French, plural of brachet, of Germanic origin; compare Old High German braccho hound Examples from the Web for brach Historical Examples of brach

  • In France there are several varieties or sub-breeds of brach hounds.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 803, May 23, 1891

    Various

  • When the brach started this from its lair, he shot it with his bow, in which he had placed a full sharp arrow.

    The Nibelungenlied

    Unknown

  • The brach was loosed, the bear sprang hence; Kriemhild’s husband would fain overtake him.

    The Nibelungenlied

    Unknown

  • Braccio, brach′yo, n. an Italian measure of length, varying from half a yard to a yard:—pl.

    Chambers’s Twentieth Century Dictionary (part 1 of 4: A-D)

    Various

  • In 1611 a Dutch merchantman (the “Brach”) reached Hirado with a cargo of pepper, cloth, ivory, silk and lead.

    Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 15, Slice 2

    Various

  • Word Origin and History for brach n.

    “bitch hound” (archaic), mid-14c., brache, originally “hound that hunts by scent,” from Old French braches “hound, hunting dog,” brachez, plural of brachet, of West Germanic origin (cf. Middle Dutch brache, Old High German braccho “hound, setter”), from PIE *bhrag- “to smell” (cf. Middle High German bræhen “to smell,” Latin fragrare “to smell sweetly”). Italian bracco is a Germanic loan word.

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