haled


haled

verb (used with object), haled, hal·ing.

  1. to compel (someone) to go: to hale a man into court.
  2. to haul; pull.

adjective

  1. healthy and robust (esp in the phrase hale and hearty)
  2. Scot and Northern English dialect whole

verb

  1. (tr) to pull or drag; haul

noun

  1. George Ellery. 1868–1938, US astronomer: undertook research into sunspots and invented the spectroheliograph
  2. Sir Matthew. 1609–76, English judge and scholar; Lord Chief Justice (1671–76)
adj.

“healthy,” Old English hal “healthy, entire, uninjured” (see health). The Scottish and northern English form of whole; it was given a literary sense of “free from infirmity” (1734). Related: Haleness.

v.

c.1200, “drag; summon,” in Middle English used of arrows, bowstrings, reins, anchors, from Old French haler “to pull, haul” (12c.), from a Germanic source, perhaps Frankish *halon or Old Dutch halen; probably also from Old English geholian “obtain” (see haul). Figurative sense of “to draw (someone) from one condition to another” is late 14c. Related: Haled; haling.

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