hoplite


hoplite

hoplite [hop-lahyt] EXAMPLES|WORD ORIGIN noun a heavily armed foot soldier of ancient Greece. Liberaldictionary.com

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  • Origin of hoplite 1720–30; Greek hoplī́tēs, equivalent to hópl(on) piece of armor, particularly the large shield + -ītēs -ite1 Related formshop·lit·ic [hop-lit-ik] /hɒpˈlɪt ɪk/, adjective Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019 Examples from the Web for hoplite Historical Examples of hoplite

  • A horseman fully armed is thrusting his spear into the body of his fallen foe—a hoplite.

    Lippincott’s Magazine Of Popular Literature And Science, No. 23, February, 1873, Vol. XI. No. 23.

    Various

  • Thirdly, if Draco had instituted a hoplite census, Solon would not have substituted citizenship by birth.

    Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 8, Slice 6

    Various

  • A horseman fully armed is thrusting his spear into the body of his fallen foe,—a hoplite.

    With the World’s Great Travellers, Volume IV

    Various

  • Now Artybios was riding a horse which had been trained to rear up against a hoplite.

    The History Of Herodotus

    Herodotus

  • Of the two figures in the chariot of slab xxiv., nothing now remains but part of the shield and left arm of the hoplite 58.

    A Catalogue of Sculpture in the Department of Greek and Roman Antiquities, British Museum, Volume I (of 2)

    A. H. Smith

  • British Dictionary definitions for hoplite hoplite noun (in ancient Greece) a heavily armed infantryman Derived Formshoplitic (hɒpˈlɪtɪk), adjectiveWord Origin for hoplite C18: from Greek hoplitēs, from hoplon weapon, from hepein to prepare Collins English Dictionary – Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012 Word Origin and History for hoplite n.

    “heavy-armed foot soldier of ancient Greece,” 1727, from Greek hoplites “heavily armed soldier,” literally “heavy armed,” from hopla “arms, armor,” plural of hoplon “tool, weapon, implement.”

    Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

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