pasteurization


pasteurization

verb (used with object), pas·teur·ized, pas·teur·iz·ing.

  1. to expose (a food, as milk, cheese, yogurt, beer, or wine) to an elevated temperature for a period of time sufficient to destroy certain microorganisms, as those that can produce disease or cause spoilage or undesirable fermentation of food, without radically altering taste or quality.

noun

  1. the process of heating beverages, such as milk, beer, wine, or cider, or solid foods, such as cheese or crab meat, to destroy harmful or undesirable microorganisms or to limit the rate of fermentation by the application of controlled heat

verb (tr)

  1. to subject (milk, beer, etc) to pasteurization
  2. rare to subject (a patient) to pasteurism

n.1885, from pasteurize + -ation. v.1881, with -ize, after Louis Pasteur (1822-1895), French chemist and bacteriologist, who invented the process of heating food, milk, wine, etc., to kill most of the micro-organisms in it; distinguished from sterilization, which involves killing all of them. The surname is literally “Pastor.” Related: Pasteurized; pasteurizing. n.

  1. The process of heating a beverage, such as milk or beer, to a specific temperature for a specific period of time in order to kill microorganisms that could cause disease, spoilage, or undesired fermentation.
  2. The process of destroying most microorganisms in certain foods, such as fish or clam meat, by irradiating them with gamma rays or other radiation to prevent spoilage.

v.

  1. To treat by pasteurization.

  1. A process in which an unfermented liquid, such as milk, or a partially fermented one, such as beer, is heated to a specific temperature for a certain amount of time in order to kill pathogens that could cause disease, spoilage, or undesired fermentation. During pasteurization, the liquid is not allowed to reach its boiling point so as to avoid changing its molecular structure.
  2. The process of destroying most pathogens in certain foods, such as fish or clams, by irradiating them with gamma rays or other radiation to prevent spoilage. See Note at Pasteur.

Heating a fluid, such as milk, for a specific period to kill harmful bacteria. This technique was developed by Louis Pasteur.

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