perturb


perturb

perturb [per-turb] SynonymsWord Origin verb (used with object)

  1. to disturb or disquiet greatly in mind; agitate.
  2. to throw into great disorder; derange.
  3. Astronomy. to cause perturbation in the orbit of (a celestial body).

Origin of perturb 1325–75; Middle English perturben (Old French perturber) Latin perturbāre to throw into confusion, equivalent to per- per- + turbāre to disturb; see turbid Related formsper·turb·a·ble, adjectiveper·turb·a·bil·i·ty, nounper·tur·ba·tious [pur-ter-bey-shuhs] /ˌpɜr tərˈbeɪ ʃəs/, adjectiveper·turb·ed·ly [per-tur-bid-lee] /pərˈtɜr bɪd li/, adverbper·turb·ed·ness, nounper·turb·er, per·tur·ba·tor [pur-ter-bey-ter] /ˈpɜr tərˌbeɪ tər/, nounper·turb·ing·ly, adverbper·turb·ment, nounnon·per·turb·a·ble, adjectivenon·per·turb·ing, adjectiveun·per·turb·a·ble, adjectiveun·per·turbed, adjectiveun·per·turb·ing, adjectiveSynonyms for perturb 1. trouble. 2. confuse, addle, muddle.Antonyms for perturb 1. pacify. Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019 British Dictionary definitions for perturbator perturb verb (tr; often passive)

  1. to disturb the composure of; trouble
  2. to throw into disorder
  3. physics astronomy to cause (a planet, electron, etc) to undergo a perturbation

Derived Formsperturbable, adjectiveperturbably, adverbperturbing, adjectiveperturbingly, adverbWord Origin for perturb C14: from Old French pertourber, from Latin perturbāre to confuse, from per- (intensive) + turbāre to agitate, from turba confusion Collins English Dictionary – Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012 Word Origin and History for perturbator perturb v.

late 14c., from Old French perturber “disturb, confuse” (14c.) and directly from Latin perturbare “to confuse, disorder, disturb,” especially of states of the mind, from per- “through” (see per) + turbare “disturb, confuse,” from turba “turmoil, crowd” (see turbid). Related: Perturbed; perturbing.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

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