quoth


quoth

quoth [kwohth] ExamplesWord Origin verb Archaic.

  1. said (used with nouns, and with first- and third-person pronouns, and always placed before the subject): Quoth the raven, “Nevermore.”

Also quo. Origin of quoth 1150–1200; preterit of quethe (otherwise obsolete), Middle English quethen, Old English cwethan to say. Cf. bequeath Examples from the Web for quoth Historical Examples of quoth

  • “The more reason that I should strive to mend him,” quoth Alleyne.

    The White Company

    Arthur Conan Doyle

  • “These are the Beating Friars, otherwise called the Flagellants,” quoth he.

    The White Company

    Arthur Conan Doyle

  • “I doubt it not, mon ami,” quoth the archer, going back to his tankard.

    The White Company

    Arthur Conan Doyle

  • “Streams may spring from one source, and yet some be clear and some be foul,” quoth she quickly.

    The White Company

    Arthur Conan Doyle

  • “There is the smoke from Bazas, on the further side of Garonne,” quoth he.

    The White Company

    Arthur Conan Doyle

  • British Dictionary definitions for quoth quoth verb

    1. archaic (used with all pronouns except thou and you, and with nouns) another word for said 1 (def. 2)

    Word Origin for quoth Old English cwæth, third person singular of cwethan to say; related to Old Frisian quetha to say, Old Saxon, Old High German quethan; see bequeath Word Origin and History for quoth v.

    Old English cwæð, third person singular past tense of cweðan “to say, speak; name, call; declare, proclaim” (Middle English quethan), from Proto-Germanic *kwithan (cf. Old Saxon quethan, Old Norse kveða, Old Frisian quetha, Old High German quedan, Gothic qiþan), from PIE root *gwet- “to say, speak” (see bequeath). Cf. also archaic quotha “said he” (1510s) for Old English cwæðe ge “think you?”

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

    38 queries 2.772