Romany


Romany

Romany [rom-uh-nee, roh-muh-] Examples noun, plural Rom·a·nies.

  1. Gypsy(def 2).
  2. Gypsies collectively.
  3. the Indic language of the Gypsies, its various forms differing greatly because of local influences.

adjective

  1. pertaining to Gypsies, their language, or their customs.

Also Rommany, Romani. Examples from the Web for romany Historical Examples of romany

  • Now the mystery of mysteries of which I have spoken in the Romany tongue is this.

    The Gypsies

    Charles G. Leland

  • I class it with the gypsy, because all who speak it are also acquainted with Romany.

    The Gypsies

    Charles G. Leland

  • I need not give the Romany which was spoken, but will simply translate.

    The Gypsies

    Charles G. Leland

  • Me tu sosti, “Thou shalt be (of) me,” is Romany, which is freely used in Shelta.

    The Gypsies

    Charles G. Leland

  • It was prepared for me by an old, well-known Romany, of full blood.

    The Gypsies

    Charles G. Leland

  • British Dictionary definitions for romany Romany Romani noun

    1. plural -nies or -nis
      1. another name for a Gypsy
      2. (as modifier)Romany customs
    2. the language of the Gypsies, belonging to the Indic branch of the Indo-European family, but incorporating extensive borrowings from local European languages. Most of its 250 000 speakers are bilingual. It is extinct in Britain

    Word Origin for Romany C19: from Romany romani (adj) Gypsy, ultimately from Sanskrit domba man of a low caste of musicians, of Dravidian origin Word Origin and History for romany Romany n.

    “a gypsy; the Gypsy language,” 1812, romani, fem. of romano (adj.) “Gypsy,” from rom, the Romany word for “man, husband, male, Gypsy” (plural roma), from Sanskrit domba-s (“with initial cerebral d, which confuses with r” [Klein]) “male member of a low caste of musicians.”

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