adverb


adverb

noun Grammar.

  1. any member of a class of words that function as modifiers of verbs or clauses, and in some languages, as Latin and English, as modifiers of adjectives, other adverbs, or adverbial phrases, as very in very nice, much in much more impressive, and tomorrow in She’ll write to you tomorrow. They relate to what they modify by indicating place (I promise to be there), time (Do your homework now!), manner (She sings beautifully), circumstance (He accidentally dropped the glass when the bell rang), degree (I’m very happy to see you), or cause (I draw, although badly).See also sentence adverb.

noun

    1. a word or group of words that serves to modify a whole sentence, a verb, another adverb, or an adjective; for example, probably, easily, very, and happily respectively in the sentence They could probably easily envy the very happily married couple
    2. (as modifier)an adverb marker

    Abbreviation: adv

n.

late 14c., from Late Latin adverbium “adverb,” literally “that which is added to a verb,” from ad- “to” (see ad-) + verbum “verb, word” (see verb). Coined by Flavius Sosipater Charisius as a translation of Greek epirrhema “adverb,” from epi- “upon, on” + rhema “verb.”

A part of speech that modifies a verb, an adjective, or another adverb. Adverbs usually answer such questions as “How?” “Where?” “When?” or “To what degree?” The following italicized words are adverbs: “He ran well”; “She ran very well”; “The mayor is highly capable.”

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