bacon


bacon

noun

  1. the back and sides of the hog, salted and dried or smoked, usually sliced thin and fried for food.
  2. Also called white bacon. South Midland and Southern U.S. pork cured in brine; salt pork.
Idioms

  1. bring home the bacon,
    1. to provide for material needs; earn a living.
    2. to accomplish a task; be successful or victorious: Our governor went to Washington to appeal for disaster relief and brought home the bacon—$40 million.
  2. save one’s bacon, Informal. to allow one to accomplish a desired end; spare one from injury or loss: Quick thinking saved our bacon.

noun

  1. FrancisBaron Verulam, Viscount St. Albans, 1561–1626, English essayist, philosopher, and statesman.
  2. Francis,1910–92, English painter, born in Ireland.
  3. Henry,1866–1924, U.S. architect.
  4. Nathaniel,1647–76, American colonist, born in England: leader of a rebellion in Virginia 1676.
  5. RogerThe Admirable Doctor, 1214?–94?, English philosopher and scientist.

noun

  1. meat from the back and sides of a pig, dried, salted, and usually smoked
  2. bring home the bacon informal
    1. to achieve success
    2. to provide material support
  3. save someone’s bacon British informal to help someone to escape from danger

noun

  1. Francis, Baron Verulam, Viscount St Albans. 1561–1626, English philosopher, statesman, and essayist; described the inductive method of reasoning: his works include Essays (1625), The Advancement of Learning (1605), and Novum Organum (1620)
  2. Francis . 1909–92, British painter, born in Dublin, noted for his distorted, richly coloured human figures, dogs, and carcasses
  3. Roger . ?1214–92, English Franciscan monk, scholar, and scientist: stressed the importance of experiment, demonstrated that air is required for combustion, and first used lenses to correct vision. His Opus Majus (1266) is a compendium of all the sciences of his age
n.

early 14c., “meat from the back and sides of a pig” (originally either fresh or cured, but especially cured), from Old French bacon, from Proto-Germanic *bakkon “back meat” (cf. Old High German bahho, Old Dutch baken “bacon”). Slang phrase bring home the bacon first recorded 1908; bacon formerly being the staple meat of the working class.

  1. English scientist and philosopher who is noted for the wide range of his knowledge and writing on scientific topics. Bacon pioneered the idea that mathematics is fundamental to science and that experimentation is essential to test scientific theories.

see bring home the bacon; save one’s bacon.

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