blent


verb

  1. a simple past tense and past participle of blend.

verb (used with object), blend·ed or blent, blend·ing.

  1. to mix smoothly and inseparably together: to blend the ingredients in a recipe.
  2. to mix (various sorts or grades) in order to obtain a particular kind or quality: Blend a little red paint with the blue paint.
  3. to prepare by such mixture: This tea is blended by mixing chamomile with pekoe.
  4. to pronounce (an utterance) as a combined sequence of sounds.

verb (used without object), blend·ed or blent, blend·ing.

  1. to mix or intermingle smoothly and inseparably: I can’t get the eggs and cream to blend.
  2. to fit or relate harmoniously; accord; go: The brown sofa did not blend with the purple wall.
  3. to have no perceptible separation: Sea and sky seemed to blend.

noun

  1. an act or manner of blending: tea of our own blend.
  2. a mixture or kind produced by blending: a special blend of rye and wheat flours.
  3. Linguistics. a word made by putting together parts of other words, as motel, made from motor and hotel, brunch, from breakfast and lunch, or guesstimate, from guess and estimate.
  4. a sequence of two or more consonant sounds within a syllable, as the bl in blend; consonant cluster.

verb

  1. archaic, or literary a past participle of blend

verb

  1. to mix or mingle (components) together thoroughly
  2. (tr) to mix (different grades or varieties of tea, whisky, tobacco, etc) to produce a particular flavour, consistency, etc
  3. (intr) to look good together; harmonize
  4. (intr) (esp of colours) to shade imperceptibly into each other

noun

  1. a mixture or type produced by blending
  2. the act of blending
  3. Also called: portmanteau word a word formed by joining together the beginning and the end of two other words“brunch” is a blend of “breakfast” and “lunch”
v.

c.1300, blenden, “to mix, mingle, stir up a liquid,” in northern writers, from or akin to rare Old English blandan “to mix,” blondan (Mercian) or Old Norse blanda “to mix,” or a combination of the two; from Proto-Germanic *blandan “to mix,” which comes via a notion of “to make cloudy” from an extended Germanic form of the PIE root *bhel- (1) “to shine, flash, burn” (see bleach (v.); also blind (adj.)). Cf. Old Saxon and Old High German blantan, Gothic blandan, Middle High German blenden “to mix;” German Blendling “bastard, mongrel,” and outside Germanic, Lithuanian blandus “troubled, turbid, thick;” Old Church Slavonic blesti “to go astray.” Figurative use from early 14c. Related: Blended; blending.

n.

“mixture formed by blending,” 1690s, from blend (v.).

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