centriole


noun Cell Biology.

  1. a small, cylindrical cell organelle, seen near the nucleus in the cytoplasm of most eukaryotic cells, that divides in perpendicular fashion during mitosis, the new pair of centrioles moving ahead of the spindle to opposite poles of the cell as the cell divides: identical in internal structure to a basal body.

noun

  1. either of two rodlike bodies in most animal cells that form the poles of the spindle during mitosis
n.

1896, from German centriol (1895), from Modern Latin centriolum, diminutive of centrum (see center (n.)).

n.

  1. One of two cylindrical cellular structures composed of nine triplet microtubules and forming the mitotic astrospheres.

  1. Either of a pair of cylinder-shaped bodies found in the centrosome of most eukaryotic organisms other than plants. During cell division (both mitosis and meiosis), the centrioles move apart to help form the spindle, which then distributes the chromosomes in the dividing cell. See more at cell meiosis mitosis.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

51 queries 1.173