chid


verb (used with object), chid·ed or chid [chid] /tʃɪd/, chid·ed or chid or chid·den [chid-n] /ˈtʃɪd n/, chid·ing.

  1. to express disapproval of; scold; reproach: The principal chided the children for their thoughtless pranks.
  2. to harass, nag, impel, or the like by chiding: She chided him into apologizing.

verb (used without object), chid·ed or chid [chid] /tʃɪd/, chid·ed or chid or chid·den [chid-n] /ˈtʃɪd n/, chid·ing.

  1. to scold or reproach; find fault.

verb chides, chiding, chided, chid, chided, chid or chidden

  1. to rebuke or scold
  2. (tr) to goad into action
v.

late 12c., “scold, nag, rail,” originally intransitive, from Old English cidan “to contend, quarrel, complain.” Not found outside Old English (though Liberman says it is “probably related to OHG *kîdal ‘wedge,'” with a sense evolution from “brandishing sticks” to “scold, reprove”). Past tense, past participle can be chided or chid or even (past participle) chidden (Shakespeare used it); present participle is chiding.

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