drabble


drabble

drabble [drab-uh l] ExamplesWord Origin verb (used with or without object), drab·bled, drab·bling.

  1. to draggle; make or become wet and dirty.

Origin of drabble 1350–1400; Middle English drabelen Middle Low German drabbeln to wade in liquid mud, bespatter, equivalent to drabbe liquid mud + -eln frequentative v. suffix; see drab2, draff Drabble [drab-uh l] noun

  1. Margaret,born 1939, English novelist.

Examples from the Web for drabble Historical Examples of drabble

  • There was a wall between Cleg and the Drabble, a wall with a place for your toes.

    Cleg Kelly, Arab of the City

    S. R. (Samuel Rutherford) Crockett

  • After that the Drabble, an it liked him, might steal all the collars in the Pleasance.

    Cleg Kelly, Arab of the City

    S. R. (Samuel Rutherford) Crockett

  • The Drabble had a reason, or at least an excuse, for being on the spot.

    Cleg Kelly, Arab of the City

    S. R. (Samuel Rutherford) Crockett

  • He merely stated what he meant to do to the Drabble when he met him again.

    Cleg Kelly, Arab of the City

    S. R. (Samuel Rutherford) Crockett

  • He was not a policeman, and if the Drabble wished to get into the lock-up, it was not his business.

    Cleg Kelly, Arab of the City

    S. R. (Samuel Rutherford) Crockett

  • British Dictionary definitions for drabble drabble verb

    1. to make or become wet or dirty

    Word Origin for drabble C14: from Low German drabbelen to paddle in mud; related to drab ² Drabble noun

    1. Dame Margaret. born 1939, British novelist and editor. Her novels include The Needle’s Eye (1972), The Radiant Way (1987), and The Seven Sisters (2002). She edited the 1985 edition of the Oxford Companion to Literature

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