elia


noun

  1. the pen name of Charles Lamb.

noun

  1. CharlesElia, 1775–1834, English essayist and critic.
  2. Harold A.,1892–1962, U.S. novelist.
  3. Mary Ann,1764–1847, English author who wrote in collaboration with her brother Charles Lamb.
  4. William, 2nd Viscount Melbourne,1779–1848, English statesman: prime minister 1834, 1835–41.
  5. Willis E(ugene), Jr.,1913–2008, U.S. physicist: Nobel Prize 1955.

noun

  1. a department of SW Greece, in the W Peloponnese: in ancient times most of the region formed the state of Elis. Pop: 183 521 (2001). Area: 2681 sq km (1035 sq miles)Modern Greek name: Ilía

noun

  1. the pen name of (Charles) Lamb

noun

  1. the young of a sheep
  2. the meat of a young sheep
  3. a person, esp a child, who is innocent, meek, good, etc
  4. a person easily deceived
  5. like a lamb to the slaughter
    1. without resistance
    2. innocently

verb

  1. Also: lamb down (intr) (of a ewe) to give birth
  2. (tr; used in the passive) (of a lamb) to be born
  3. (intr) (of a shepherd) to tend the ewes and newborn lambs at lambing time

noun

  1. the Lamb a title given to Christ in the New Testament

noun

  1. Charles, pen name Elia. 1775–1834, English essayist and critic. He collaborated with his sister Mary on Tales from Shakespeare (1807). His other works include Specimens of English Dramatic Poets (1808) and the largely autobiographical essays collected in Essays of Elia (1823; 1833)
  2. William. See (2nd Viscount) Melbourne 2
  3. Willis Eugene. 1913–2008, US physicist. He detected the small difference in energy between two states of the hydrogen atom (Lamb shift). Nobel prize for physics 1955
n.

Old English lamb “lamb,” from Proto-Germanic *lambaz (cf. Old Norse, Old Frisian, Gothic lamb, Middle Dutch, Dutch lam, Middle High German lamp, German Lamm “lamb”). Common to the Germanic languages, but with no certain cognates outside them. Old English plural was lomberu. Applied to persons (especially young Church members, gentle souls, etc.) from late Old English. Also sometimes used ironically for cruel or rough characters (e.g. Kirke’s Lambs in wars of 1684-86). Lamb’s-wool (adj.) is from 1550s.

see hanged for a sheep (as a lamb); in two shakes (of a lamb’s tail); like a lamb to the slaughter.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

50 queries 1.444