ferdinand


noun

  1. a male given name: from Germanic words meaning “bold” and “peace.”

noun

  1. Spanish Fernando I. Ferdinand the Great, died 1065, king of Castile 1033–65, king of Navarre and Leon 1037–65; emperor of Spain 1056–65.
  2. 1503–64, king of Bohemia and Hungary 1526–64; emperor of the Holy Roman Empire 1558–64 (brother of Emperor Charles V).
  3. Maximilian Karl Leopold Maria, 1861–1948, king of Bulgaria 1908–18.

noun

  1. the Catholic, 1452–1516, founder of the Spanish monarchy 1506: king of Sicily 1468–1516, king of Aragon 1479–1516; as Ferdinand III, king of Naples 1504–16; as King Ferdinand V, joint sovereign (with Isabella I) of Castile 1474–1504.
  2. 1578–1637, king of Bohemia 1617–19, 1620–37; king of Hungary 1619?–37; emperor of the Holy Roman Empire 1620–37.

noun

  1. Ferdinand II(def 1).
  2. 1608–57, king of Hungary 1625–57, king of Bohemia 1627–57, king of Germany 1636–57; emperor of the Holy Roman Empire 1637–57 (son of Ferdinand II).

noun

  1. Ferdinand II(def 1).

noun

  1. 1713–59, king of Spain 1746–59 (son of Philip V).

noun

  1. 1784–1833, king of Spain 1808, 1814–33.

noun

  1. See Franz Ferdinand

noun

  1. known as Ferdinand the Great. ?1016–65, king of Castile (1035–65) and León (1037–65): achieved control of the Moorish kings of Saragossa, Seville, and Toledo
  2. 1503–64, king of Hungary and Bohemia (1526–64); Holy Roman Emperor (1558–64), bringing years of religious warfare to an end
  3. 1751–1825, king of the Two Sicilies (1816–25); king of Naples (1759–1806; 1815–25), as Ferdinand IV, being dispossessed by Napoleon (1806–15)
  4. 1793–1875, king of Hungary (1830–48) and emperor of Austria (1835–48); abdicated after the Revolution of 1848 in favour of his nephew, Franz Josef I
  5. 1861–1948, ruling prince of Bulgaria (1887–1908) and tsar from 1908 until his abdication in 1918
  6. 1865–1927, king of Romania (1914–27); sided with the Allies in World War I

noun

  1. 1578–1637, Holy Roman Emperor (1619–37); king of Bohemia (1617–19; 1620–37) and of Hungary (1617–37). His anti-Protestant policies led to the Thirty Years’ War
  2. title as king of Aragon and Sicily of Ferdinand V

noun

  1. 1608–57, Holy Roman Emperor (1637–57) and king of Hungary (1625–57); son of Ferdinand II
  2. title as king of Naples of Ferdinand V

noun

  1. 1784–1833, king of Spain (1808; 1814–33). He precipitated the Carlist Wars by excluding his brother Don Carlos as his successor

noun

  1. known as Ferdinand the Catholic. 1452–1516, king of Castile (1474–1504); as Ferdinand II, king of Aragon (1479–1516) and Sicily (1468–1516); as Ferdinand III, king of Naples (1504–16). His marriage to Isabella I of Castile (1469) led to the union of Aragon and Castile and his reconquest of Granada from the Moors (1492) completed the unification of Spain. He introduced the Inquisition (1478), expelled the Jews from Spain (1492), and financed Columbus’ voyage to the New World

masc. proper name, of Germanic origin, first element perhaps Proto-Germanic *farthi, abstract noun from root *far- “to fare, travel” (see fare (v.)); second element perhaps related to Old English neðan, Old High German nendan “to risk, venture.”

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