funnel


noun

  1. a cone-shaped utensil with a tube at the apex for conducting liquid or other substance through a small opening, as into a bottle, jug, or the like.
  2. a smokestack, especially of a steamship.
  3. a flue, tube, or shaft, as for ventilation.
  4. Eastern New England. a stovepipe.

verb (used with object), fun·neled, fun·nel·ing or (especially British) fun·nelled, fun·nel·ling.

  1. to concentrate, channel, or focus: They funneled all income into research projects.
  2. to pour through or as if through a funnel.

verb (used without object), fun·neled, fun·nel·ing or (especially British) fun·nelled, fun·nel·ling.

  1. to pass through or as if through a funnel.

noun

  1. a hollow utensil with a wide mouth tapering to a small hole, used for pouring liquids, powders, etc, into a narrow-necked vessel
  2. something resembling this in shape or function
  3. a smokestack for smoke and exhaust gases, as on a steamship or steam locomotive
  4. a shaft or tube, as in a building, for ventilation

verb -nels, nelling or -nelled or US -nels, -neling or -neled

  1. to move or cause to move or pour through or as if through a funnel
  2. to concentrate or focus or be concentrated or focused in a particular directionthey funnelled their attention on the problem
  3. (intr) to take on a funnel-like shape
n.

c.1400, from Middle French fonel, from Provençal enfounilh, “a word from the Southern wine trade” [Weekley], from Late Latin fundibulum, shortened from Latin infundibulum “a funnel or hopper in a mill,” from infundere “pour in,” from in- “in” + fundere “pour” (see found (v.2)).

v.

1590s, from funnel (n.). Related: Funneled; funneling.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

51 queries 1.254