georg simon ohm


noun

  1. Ge·org Si·mon, [gey-awrk zee-mawn] /geɪˈɔrk ˈzi mɔn/1787–1854, German physicist.

noun

  1. the derived SI unit of electrical resistance; the resistance between two points on a conductor when a constant potential difference of 1 volt between them produces a current of 1 ampereSymbol: Ω

noun

  1. Georg Simon (ˈɡeːɔrk ˈziːmɔn). 1787–1854, German physicist, who formulated the law named after him
n.

unit of electrical resistance, 1867, in recognition of German physicist Georg S. Ohm (1789-1854), who determined the law of the flow of electricity. Originally proposed as ohma (1861) as a unit of voltage. Related: ohmage; ohmic; ohmeter.

n. Symbol Ω

  1. A unit of electrical resistance equal to that of a conductor in which a current of one ampere is produced by a potential of one volt across its terminals.

  1. German physicist who discovered the relationship between voltage, current, and resistance in an electrical circuit, now known as Ohm’s law. The ohm unit of electrical resistance is named for him.

  1. The SI derived unit used to measure the electrical resistance of a material or an electrical device. One ohm is equal to the resistance of a conductor through which a current of one ampere flows when a potential difference of one volt is applied to it.

The unit of electrical resistance, named after the nineteenth-century German physicist Georg Ohm.

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