gerundial


noun Grammar.

  1. (in certain languages, as Latin) a form regularly derived from a verb and functioning as a noun, having in Latin all case forms but the nominative, as Latin dicendī gen., dicendō, dat., abl., etc., “saying.”See also gerundive(def 1).
  2. the English -ing form of a verb when functioning as a noun, as writing in Writing is easy.
  3. a form similar to the Latin gerund in meaning or function.

noun

  1. a noun formed from a verb, denoting an action or state. In English, the gerund, like the present participle, is formed in -ingthe living is easy
n.

1510s, from Late Latin gerundium, from Old Latin gerundum “to be carried out,” gerundive of gerere “to bear, carry” (see gest). In Latin, a verbal noun used for all cases of the infinitive but the nominative; applied in English to verbal nouns in -ing.

A form of a verb that ends in -ing and operates as a noun in a sentence: “Thinking can be painful.”

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