halest


halest

adjective, hal·er, hal·est.

  1. free from disease or infirmity; robust; vigorous: hale and hearty men in the prime of life.

adjective

  1. healthy and robust (esp in the phrase hale and hearty)
  2. Scot and Northern English dialect whole

verb

  1. (tr) to pull or drag; haul

noun

  1. George Ellery. 1868–1938, US astronomer: undertook research into sunspots and invented the spectroheliograph
  2. Sir Matthew. 1609–76, English judge and scholar; Lord Chief Justice (1671–76)
adj.

“healthy,” Old English hal “healthy, entire, uninjured” (see health). The Scottish and northern English form of whole; it was given a literary sense of “free from infirmity” (1734). Related: Haleness.

v.

c.1200, “drag; summon,” in Middle English used of arrows, bowstrings, reins, anchors, from Old French haler “to pull, haul” (12c.), from a Germanic source, perhaps Frankish *halon or Old Dutch halen; probably also from Old English geholian “obtain” (see haul). Figurative sense of “to draw (someone) from one condition to another” is late 14c. Related: Haled; haling.

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