heath


noun

  1. a tract of open and uncultivated land; wasteland overgrown with shrubs.
  2. any of various low-growing evergreen shrubs common on such land, as the common heather, Calluna vulgaris.
  3. any plant of the genus Erica, or of the family Ericaceae.

noun

  1. Sir Edward (Richard George),1916–2005, British statesman: prime minister 1970–74.

noun

  1. British a large open area, usually with sandy soil and scrubby vegetation, esp heather
  2. Also called: heather any low-growing evergreen ericaceous shrub of the Old World genus Erica and related genera, having small bell-shaped typically pink or purple flowers
  3. any of several nonericaceous heathlike plants, such as sea heath
  4. Australian any of various heathlike plants of the genus Epacris : family Epacridaceae
  5. any of various small brown satyrid butterflies of the genus Coenonympha, with coppery-brown wings, esp the large heath (C. tullia)

noun

  1. Sir Edward (Richard George). 1916–2005, British statesman; leader of the Conservative Party (1965–75); prime minister (1970–74)
n.

Old English hæð “untilled land, tract of wasteland,” earlier “heather,” influenced by Old Norse heiðr “field,” from Proto-Germanic *haithiz (cf. Old Saxon hetha, Old High German heida “heather,” Dutch heide “heath,” Gothic haiþi “field”), from PIE *kaito “forest, uncultivated land” (cf. Old Irish ciad, Welsh coed, Breton coet “wood, forest”).

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