mandibular


mandibular

mandibular [man-dib-yuh-ler] ExamplesWord Origin adjective

  1. pertaining to or of the nature of a mandible.

Origin of mandibular 1645–55; Late Latin mandibul(a) mandible + -ar1 Related formsin·ter·man·dib·u·lar, adjectivepost·man·dib·u·lar, adjectivepre·man·dib·u·lar, adjective Examples from the Web for mandibular Historical Examples of mandibular

  • In some Gymnophiona there is a double row of mandibular teeth.

    The Vertebrate Skeleton

    Sidney H. Reynolds

  • The mandibular symphysis does not reach beyond the eighth tooth.

    Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 7, Slice 6

    Various

  • The postoral arches formed are the mandibular, hyoid and five branchial arches.

    The Works of Francis Maitland Balfour, Volume III (of 4)

    Francis Maitland Balfour

  • The mandibular arch (md) is placed on the hinder border of the mouth, and is separated by a deep groove from the hyoid arch (hy).

    The Works of Francis Maitland Balfour, Volume III (of 4)

    Francis Maitland Balfour

  • Behind the mandibular arch are present a well-developed hyoid (hy) and a first branchial arch (not shewn in fig. 146).

    The Works of Francis Maitland Balfour, Volume III (of 4)

    Francis Maitland Balfour

  • Word Origin and History for mandibular adj.

    1650s, from Latin mandibula (see mandible) + -ar.

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