mannose


mannose

mannose [man-ohs] ExamplesWord Origin noun Chemistry.

  1. a hexose, C6H12O6, obtained from the hydrolysis of the ivory nut and yielding mannitol upon reduction.

Origin of mannose First recorded in 1885–90; mann(a) + -ose2 Examples from the Web for mannose Historical Examples of mannose

  • It appears to be resolved by ultimate hydrolysis into dextrose and mannose.

    Researches on Cellulose

    C. F. Cross

  • The osones from glucose, mannose, and fructose are identical.

    The Chemistry of Plant Life

    Roscoe Wilfred Thatcher

  • The process is reversible; mannose can be converted to mannonic acid, thence to gluconic acid, thence to glucose.

    The Chemistry of Plant Life

    Roscoe Wilfred Thatcher

  • The hydrazones of the common sugars, with the exception of the one from mannose, are colorless compounds, easily soluble in water.

    The Chemistry of Plant Life

    Roscoe Wilfred Thatcher

  • Mannan bears the same relation to mannose that starch does to glucose and inulin to fructose.

    The Chemistry of Plant Life

    Roscoe Wilfred Thatcher

  • British Dictionary definitions for mannose mannose noun

    1. a hexose sugar found in mannitol and many polysaccharides. Formula: C 6 H 12 O 6

    Word Origin for mannose C20: from manna + -ose ² mannose in Medicine mannose [măn′ōs′] n.

    1. A monosaccharide obtained from various plants by the oxidation of mannitol.

    mannose in Science mannose [măn′ōs′]

    1. A naturally occurring simple sugar that is a stereoisomer of glucose. Chemical formula: C6H12O6.

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