messianically


messianically

noun

  1. the promised and expected deliverer of the Jewish people.
  2. Jesus Christ, regarded by Christians as fulfilling this promise and expectation. John 4:25, 26.
  3. (usually lowercase) any expected deliverer.
  4. (usually lowercase) a zealous leader of some cause or project.
  5. (italics) an oratorio (1742) by George Frideric Handel.

noun

  1. Judaism the awaited redeemer of the Jews, to be sent by God to free them
  2. Jesus Christ, when regarded in this role
  3. an exceptional or hoped for liberator of a country or people

n.c.1300, Messias, from Late Latin Messias, from Greek Messias, from Aramaic meshiha and Hebrew mashiah “the anointed” (of the Lord), from mashah “anoint.” This is the word rendered in Septuagint as Greek Khristos (see Christ). In Old Testament prophetic writing, it was used of an expected deliverer of the Jewish nation. The modern English form represents an attempt to make the word look more Hebrew, and dates from the Geneva Bible (1560). Transferred sense of “an expected liberator or savior of a captive people” is attested from 1660s. For Jews (see also Jews) and Christians (see also Christian), the promised “anointed one” or Christ; the Savior. Christians believe that Jesus was the Messiah who delivered mankind from its sins. Jews believe that the Messiah has not yet come. In Judaism and Christianity, the promised “anointed one” or Christ; the Savior. Christians (see also Christian) believe that Jesus was the Messiah who delivered mankind from original sin (see also original sin). Jews (see also Jews) believe that the Messiah has not yet come. An oratorio by George Frederick Handel on the life of Jesus. Written for solo singers, chorus, and orchestra, it contains the “Hallelujah Chorus.” In the United States, it is often sung during the Christmas season.

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