mildly


mildly

adjective, mild·er, mild·est.

  1. amiably gentle or temperate in feeling or behavior toward others.
  2. characterized by or showing such gentleness, as manners or speech: a mild voice.
  3. not cold, severe, or extreme, as air or weather: mild breezes.
  4. not sharp, pungent, or strong: a mild flavor.
  5. not acute or serious, as disease: a mild case of flu.
  6. gentle or moderate in force or effect: mild penalties.
  7. soft; pleasant: mild sunshine.
  8. moderate in intensity, degree, or character: mild regret.
  9. British Dialect. comparatively soft and easily worked, as soil, wood, or stone.
  10. Obsolete. kind or gracious.

noun

  1. British. beer that has a blander taste than bitter.

adjective

  1. (of a taste, sensation, etc) not powerful or strong; blanda mild curry
  2. gentle or temperate in character, climate, behaviour, etc
  3. not extreme; moderatea mild rebuke
  4. feeble; unassertive

noun

  1. British draught beer, of darker colour than bitter and flavoured with fewer hops

adv.Old English mildelice “graciously, affably, kindly;” see mild + -ly (2). Phrase to put it mildly is attested from 1929. adj.Old English milde “gentle, merciful,” from Proto-Germanic *milthjaz- (cf. Old Norse mildr, Old Saxon mildi, Old Frisian milde, Middle Dutch milde, Dutch mild, Old High German milti, German milde “mild,” Gothic mildiþa “kindness”), from PIE *meldh-, from root *mel- “soft,” with derivatives referring to soft or softened materials (cf. Greek malthon “weakling,” myle “mill;” Latin molere “to grind;” Old Irish meldach “tender;” Sanskrit mrdh “to neglect,” also “to be moist”). Originally of persons and powers; of the weather from c.1400, of disease from 1744. Also in Old English as an adverb, “mercifully, graciously.” see put it mildly.

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