non-imperative


non-imperative

adjective

  1. absolutely necessary or required; unavoidable: It is imperative that we leave.
  2. of the nature of or expressing a command; commanding.
  3. Grammar. noting or pertaining to the mood of the verb used in commands, requests, etc., as in Listen! Go!Compare indicative(def 2), subjunctive(def 1).

noun

  1. a command.
  2. something that demands attention or action; an unavoidable obligation or requirement; necessity: It is an imperative that we help defend friendly nations.
  3. Grammar.
    1. the imperative mood.
    2. a verb in this mood.
  4. an obligatory statement, principle, or the like.

adjective

  1. extremely urgent or important; essential
  2. peremptory or authoritativean imperative tone of voice
  3. Also: imperatival (ɪmˌpɛrəˈtaɪvəl) grammar denoting a mood of verbs used in giving orders, making requests, etc. In English the verb root without any inflections is the usual form, as for example leave in Leave me alone

noun

  1. something that is urgent or essential
  2. an order or command
  3. grammar
    1. the imperative mood
    2. a verb in this mood

adj.1520s, from Late Latin imperativus “pertaining to a command,” from imperatus “commanded,” past participle of imperare “to command, to requisition,” from assimilated form of in- “into, in” (see in- (2)) + parare “prepare” (see pare). n.mid-15c., in grammar; later “something imperative” (c.1600), from Old French imperatif and directly from Late Latin imperativus (see imperative (adj.)). A grammatical category describing verbs that command or request: “Leave town by tonight”; “Please hand me the spoon.”

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