ode


ode

noun

  1. a lyric poem typically of elaborate or irregular metrical form and expressive of exalted or enthusiastic emotion.
  2. (originally) a poem intended to be sung.

  1. a suffix of nouns, appearing in loanwords from Greek, where it meant “like”; used in the formation of compound words: phyllode.

  1. a combining form meaning “way,” “road,” used in the formation of compound words: anode; electrode.

noun

  1. a lyric poem, typically addressed to a particular subject, with lines of varying lengths and complex rhythmsSee also Horatian ode, Pindaric ode
  2. (formerly) a poem meant to be sung

n combining form

  1. denoting resemblancenematode

n combining form

  1. denoting a path or wayelectrode

n.1580s, from Middle French ode (c.1500), from Late Latin ode “lyric song,” from Greek oide, Attic contraction of aoide “song, ode;” related to aeidein (Attic aidein) “to sing;” aoidos (Attic oidos) “a singer, singing;” aude “voice, tone, sound,” probably from a PIE *e-weid-, perhaps from root *wed- “to speak.” In classical use, “a poem intended to be sung;” in modern use usually a rhymed lyric, often an address, usually dignified, rarely extending to 150 lines. Related: Odic. suff.

  1. Way; path:electrode.

A kind of poem devoted to the praise of a person, animal, or thing. An ode is usually written in an elevated style and often expresses deep feeling. An example is “Ode on a Grecian Urn,” by John Keats.

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