peristaltic


peristaltic

peristaltic [per-uh-stawl-tik, -stal-] ExamplesWord Origin adjective Physiology.

  1. of, relating to, or resembling peristalsis.

Origin of peristaltic 1645–55; Greek peristaltikós compressing, equivalent to peri- peri- + stal- (see peristalsis) + -tikos -tic Related formsper·i·stal·ti·cal·ly, adverbhy·per·per·i·stal·tic, adjective Examples from the Web for peristaltic Historical Examples of peristaltic

  • Observe, too, the rhythm of the peristaltic action of the stomach.

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  • Undoubtedly the peristaltic functions of the intestines can be encouraged by a favorable attitude of the will towards them.

    Health Through Will Power

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  • In cancer, as in many other diseases of the stomach, the peristaltic movements of the intestine are inclined to be sluggish.

    A System of Practical Medicine By American Authors, Vol. II

    Various

  • Sometimes the peristaltic waves of the stomach can be perceived through the thin abdominal walls.

    A System of Practical Medicine By American Authors, Vol. II

    Various

  • The peristaltic waves generally pass from left to right, rarely in the opposite direction as well.

    A System of Practical Medicine By American Authors, Vol. II

    Various

  • Word Origin and History for peristaltic adj.

    1650s, from Modern Latin, from Greek peristaltikos (Galen), literally “contracting around,” from peri (see peri-) “around, about” + stalsis “checking, constriction,” related to stellein “draw in, bring together; set in order” (see diastole).

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