quintal


quintal

quintal [kwin-tl] ExamplesWord Origin noun

  1. a unit of weight equal to 100 kilograms (220.5 avoirdupois pounds).
  2. hundredweight.

Origin of quintal 1425–75; late Middle English Medieval Latin quintāle Arabic qinṭār weight of a hundred pounds, probably ≪ Latin centēnārius. Cf. centenary, kantar, kilderkin Examples from the Web for quintal Historical Examples of quintal

  • “‘Wouldn’t hev your conscience fer a thousand quintal,” said Dan.

    “Captains Courageous”

    Rudyard Kipling

  • You see, we’re first off the Banks this season, and it’s four twenty-five a quintal.

    “Captains Courageous”

    Rudyard Kipling

  • Pray back a nine-thousand-dollar boat an’ a thousand quintal of fish.

    “Captains Courageous”

    Rudyard Kipling

  • There isn’t but three—no—two ninety-four or five quintal more by my reckoning.

    “Captains Courageous”

    Rudyard Kipling

  • Quintal had probably not intended to hurt the child, but he expressed no regret.

    The Lonely Island

    R.M. Ballantyne

  • British Dictionary definitions for quintal quintal noun

    1. a unit of weight equal to 100 pounds
    2. a unit of weight equal to 100 kilograms

    Word Origin for quintal C15: via Old French from Arabic qintār, possibly from Latin centēnārius consisting of a hundred Word Origin and History for quintal n.

    “a weight of a hundred pounds,” c.1400, from Old French quintal “hundredweight,” and directly from Medieval Latin quintale, from Arabic quintar, from Late Greek kentenarion, from Latin centenarius “containing a hundred” (see centenary).

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

    51 queries 2.460