reformed


reformed

adjective

  1. amended by removal of faults, abuses, etc.
  2. improved in conduct, morals, etc.
  3. (initial capital letter) noting or pertaining to Protestant churches, especially Calvinist as distinguished from Lutheran.

verb (used with or without object)

  1. to form again.

noun

  1. the improvement or amendment of what is wrong, corrupt, unsatisfactory, etc.: social reform; spelling reform.
  2. an instance of this.
  3. the amendment of conduct, belief, etc.

verb (used with object)

  1. to change to a better state, form, etc.; improve by alteration, substitution, abolition, etc.
  2. to cause (a person) to abandon wrong or evil ways of life or conduct.
  3. to put an end to (abuses, disorders, etc.).
  4. Chemistry. to subject to the process of reforming, as in refining petroleum.

verb (used without object)

  1. to abandon evil conduct or error: The drunkard promised to reform.

adjective

  1. (initial capital letter) of, relating to, or characteristic of Reform Jews or Reform Judaism: a Reform rabbi.

adjective

  1. of or designating a Protestant Church, esp the Calvinist as distinct from the Lutheran
  2. of or designating Reform Judaism

verb

  1. (tr) to improve (an existing institution, law, practice, etc) by alteration or correction of abuses
  2. to give up or cause to give up a reprehensible habit or immoral way of life
  3. chem to change the molecular structure of (a hydrocarbon) to make it suitable for use as petrol by heat, pressure, and the action of catalysts

noun

  1. an improvement or change for the better, esp as a result of correction of legal or political abuses or malpractices
  2. a principle, campaign, or measure aimed at achieving such change
  3. improvement of morals or behaviour, esp by giving up some vice

verb

  1. to form anew
v.

c.1300, “to convert into another and better form,” from Old French reformer “rebuild, reconstruct, recreate” (12c.), from Latin reformare “to form again, change, transform, alter,” from re- “again” (see re-) + formare “to form” (see form (n.)). Intransitive sense from 1580s.

Meaning “to bring (a person) away from an evil course of life” is recorded from early 15c.; of governments, institutions, etc., from early 15c. Related: Reformed; reforming. Reformed churches (1580s) usually are Calvinist as opposed to Lutheran. Reformed Judaism (1843) is a movement initiated in Germany by Moses Mendelssohn (1729-1786). Reform school is attested from 1859.

n.

“any proceeding which brings back a better order of things,” 1660s, from reform (v.) and in some uses from French réforme. As a branch of Judaism from 1843.

v.

“form again,” mid-14c., from re- + form (v.). Related: Re-formed; re-forming; re-formation.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

50 queries 2.478