relaxed


relaxed

adjective

  1. being free of or relieved from tension or anxiety: in a relaxed mood.
  2. not strict; easy; informal: the relaxed rules of the club.

verb (used with object)

  1. to make less tense, rigid, or firm; make lax: to relax the muscles.
  2. to diminish the force of.
  3. to slacken or abate, as effort, attention, etc.
  4. to make less strict or severe, as rules, discipline, etc.: to relax the requirements for a license.
  5. to release or bring relief from the effects of tension, anxiety, etc.: A short swim always relaxes me.

verb (used without object)

  1. to become less tense, rigid, or firm.
  2. to become less strict or severe; grow milder.
  3. to reduce or stop work, effort, application, etc., especially for the sake of rest or recreation.
  4. to release oneself from inhibition, worry, tension, etc.

verb

  1. to make (muscles, a grip, etc) less tense or rigid or (of muscles, a grip, etc) to become looser or less rigid
  2. (intr) to take rest or recreation, as from work or efforton Sundays, she just relaxes; she relaxes by playing golf
  3. to lessen the force of (effort, concentration, etc) or (of effort) to become diminished
  4. to make (rules or discipline) less rigid or strict or (of rules, etc) to diminish in severity
  5. (intr) (of a person) to become less formal; unbend
v.

late 14c., “to make (something) less compact or dense,” from Old French relaschier “set free; soften; reduce” (14c.), from Latin relaxare “relax, loosen, open, stretch out, widen again; make loose,” from re- “back” (see re-) + laxare “loosen,” from laxus “loose” (see lax). Of persons, “to become less formal,” from 1837. Meaning “decrease tension” is from early 15c.; intransitive sense of “to become less tense” is recorded from 1935. Related: Relaxed; relaxing.

v.

  1. To make or become lax or loose.
  2. To relieve or become relieved from tension or strain.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

51 queries 1.174