reposed


reposed

verb (used with or without object), re-posed, re-pos·ing.

  1. to pose again.

noun

  1. the state of reposing or being at rest; rest; sleep.
  2. peace; tranquillity; calm.
  3. dignified calmness, as of manner; composure.
  4. absence of movement, animation, etc.: When in repose, her face recalls the Mona Lisa.

verb (used without object), re·posed, re·pos·ing.

  1. to lie or be at rest, as from work, activity, etc.
  2. to lie dead: His body will repose in the chapel for two days.
  3. to be peacefully calm and quiet: The sea reposed under the tropical sun.
  4. to lie or rest on something.
  5. Archaic. to depend or rely on a person or thing.

verb (used with object), re·posed, re·pos·ing.

  1. to lay to rest; rest; refresh by rest (often used reflexively).

verb (used with object), re·posed, re·pos·ing.

  1. to put (confidence, trust, etc.) in a person or thing.
  2. to put under the authority or at the disposal of a person.
  3. Archaic. to deposit.

noun

  1. a state of quiet restfulness; peace or tranquillity
  2. dignified calmness of manner; composure

verb

  1. to place (oneself or one’s body) in a state of quiet relaxation; lie or lay down at rest
  2. (intr) to lie when dead, as in the grave
  3. (intr ; foll by on, in, etc) formal to take support (from) or be based (on)your plan reposes on a fallacy

verb (tr)

  1. to put (trust or confidence) in a person or thing
  2. to place or put (an object) somewhere
v.1

“lie at rest,” mid-15c., from Middle French reposer, from Old French repauser (10c.), from Late Latin repausare “cause to rest,” from Latin re-, here probably an intensive prefix (see re-), + Late Latin pausare “to stop” (see pause (v.)). Related: Reposed; reposing.

v.2

“put, place,” mid-15c., from Latin repos-, stem of reponere “put back, set back, replace, restore; put away, lay out, stretch out,” from re- “back, away” (see re-) + ponere “to put, place” (see position (n.)). Or perhaps [Klein] formed in Middle English from Old French poser, on model of disposen “dispose.”

n.

“rest,” c.1500, from Middle French repos (11c.), back-formation from reposer (see repose (v.1)).

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

46 queries 1.179