tax


tax

noun

  1. a sum of money demanded by a government for its support or for specific facilities or services, levied upon incomes, property, sales, etc.
  2. a burdensome charge, obligation, duty, or demand.

verb (used with object)

  1. (of a government)
    1. to demand a tax from (a person, business, etc.).
    2. to demand a tax in consideration of the possession or occurrence of (income, goods, sales, etc.), usually in proportion to the value of money involved.
  2. to lay a burden on; make serious demands on: to tax one’s resources.
  3. to take to task; censure; reprove; accuse: to tax one with laziness.
  4. Informal. to charge: What did he tax you for that?
  5. Archaic. to estimate or determine the amount or value of.

verb (used without object)

  1. to levy taxes.

  1. variant of taxo- before a vowel: taxeme.

noun

  1. a tax levied according to the value of the property, merchandise, etc., being taxed.

noun

  1. a compulsory financial contribution imposed by a government to raise revenue, levied on the income or property of persons or organizations, on the production costs or sales prices of goods and services, etc
  2. a heavy demand on something; straina tax on our resources

verb (tr)

  1. to levy a tax on (persons, companies, etc, or their incomes, etc)
  2. to make heavy demands on; strainto tax one’s intellect
  3. to accuse, charge, or blamehe was taxed with the crime
  4. to determine (the amount legally chargeable or allowable to a party to a legal action), as by examining the solicitor’s bill of coststo tax costs
  5. slang to steal

v.c.1300, “impose a tax on,” from Old French taxer “impose a tax” (13c.), from Latin taxare “evaluate, estimate, assess, handle,” also “censure, charge,” probably a frequentative form of tangere “to touch” (see tangent). Sense of “burden, put a strain on” first recorded 1670s; that of “censure, reprove” is from 1560s. Its use in Luke ii for Greek apographein “to enter on a list, enroll” is due to Tyndale. Related: Taxed; taxing. n.early 14c., “obligatory contribution levied by a sovereign or government,” from Anglo-French tax, Old French taxe, and directly from Medieval Latin taxa, from Latin taxare (see tax (v.)). Related: taxes. Tax shelter is attested from 1961. In addition to the idiom beginning with tax

  • tax with
  • also see:

  • death and taxes
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