uncurrent


uncurrent

adjective

  1. passing in time; belonging to the time actually passing: the current month.
  2. prevalent; customary: the current practice.
  3. popular; in vogue: current fashions.
  4. new; present; most recent: the current issue of a publication.
  5. publicly reported or known: a rumor that is current.
  6. passing from one to another; circulating, as a coin.
  7. Archaic. running; flowing.
  8. Obsolete. genuine; authentic.

noun

  1. a flowing; flow, as of a river.
  2. something that flows, as a stream.
  3. a large portion of air, large body of water, etc., moving in a certain direction.
  4. the speed at which such flow moves; velocity of flow.
  5. Electricity. electric current.
  6. a course, as of time or events; the main course; the general tendency.

adjective

  1. of the immediate present; in progresscurrent events
  2. most recent; up-to-date
  3. commonly known, practised, or accepted; widespreada current rumour
  4. circulating and valid at presentcurrent coins

noun

  1. (esp of water or air) a steady usually natural flow
  2. a mass of air, body of water, etc, that has a steady flow in a particular direction
  3. the rate of flow of such a mass
  4. Also called: electric current physics
    1. a flow of electric charge through a conductor
    2. the rate of flow of this charge. It is measured in amperesSymbol: I
  5. a general trend or driftcurrents of opinion

n.late 14c., from Middle French corant (Modern French courant), from Old French corant (see current (adj.)). Applied 1747 to the flow of electrical force. adj.c.1300, “running, flowing,” from Old French corant “running, lively, eager, swift,” present participle of corre “to run,” from Latin currere “to run, move quickly” (of persons or things), from PIE *kers- “to run” (cf. Greek -khouros “running,” Lithuanian karsiu “go quickly,” Old Norse horskr “swift,” Old Irish and Middle Welsh carr “cart, wagon,” Breton karr “chariot,” Welsh carrog “torrent”). Meaning “prevalent, generally accepted” is from 1560s. n.

  1. A stream or flow of a liquid or gas.
  2. A flow of electric charge.
  3. The amount of electric charge flowing past a specified circuit point per unit time.

  1. A flowing movement in a liquid, gas, plasma, or other form of matter, especially one that follows a recognizable course.
  2. A flow of positive electric charge. The strength of current flow in any medium is related to voltage differences in that medium, as well as the electrical properties of the medium, and is measured in amperes. Since electrons are stipulated to have a negative charge, current in an electrical circuit actually flows in the opposite direction of the movement of electrons. See also electromagnetism Ohm’s law. See Note at electric charge.

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